18
Jan

Indiana Considers Nursing Home Emergency Policies

January 18, 2012

After it was discovered that staff in numerous nursing homes across Indiana were not properly calling for help in emergency situations concerning patients, WTHR 13 News reports that state lawmakers are creating new regulations that will work to ensure patients get the care that they need in a timely manner.

The push was sparked by the death of a woman last March. She was suffering from cardiac arrest when caregivers at Wildwood Healthcare found her. The LPN on-duty called CARE ambulance to take the woman to the hospital, but the company did not have an ambulance available. Instead of passing the call to the Volunteer Fire Department five minutes away, CARE called in an off-duty crew nearly 20 minutes away. The woman died waiting for the ambulance.

In the aftermath of the tragedy, the state health department found that the facility was negligent cited Wildwood healthcare for “failure to ensure appropriate care” to patients for failing to call 911 at two key moments.

In response, lawmakers created State Senate Bill 224, which would require state officials to create a new report on response times and practices for responding to 911 calls. Also, it would create equipment requirements on ambulances, and transportation procedures for nursing home emergency and non-emergency transport.

The Indiana nursing home abuse lawyers with Stewart and Stewart say that it could be considered neglect on the caregiver’s part to not call 911 during an emergency. If you have been hurt or lost a loved one because of a caregiver’s negligence, get in touch with us today to discus your case.

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11
Jan

New Guidelines Regulate Children’s Safety Seat Use

January 11, 2012

In an effort to educate parents and caregivers on how to select a child safety seat and when the appropriate time is to transition your child to the next type of safety seat, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has issued a press release discussing new guidelines the agency has set for children’s safety seats.

The new guidelines are categorized by age, rather than by type of safety seat. This is in an effort to stay relevant to data showing that this is what new child restraint system development is based on.

Recommendations for children’s car seat positions were:

  • Birth-12 Months- Child should always ride in rear-facing car seat
  • 1-3 Years- Keep your child in rear-facing car seat as long as possible based on height and weight limits set by the seats manufacturer. When your child has outgrown the rear-facing position, then move them to a front facing car seat
  • 4-7 Years- Keep your child in the forward-facing car seat until they have reached height and/or weight limits established by the seat’s manufacturer
  • 8-12 Years- Keep your child in a booster seat until they are big enough to fit into a seat belt properly

Indiana state law says that children under the age of seven are required to be buckled into a child safety restraint system when riding in a car.

The Indiana auto accident attorneys with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers ask that parents check their children’s safety seat limits to ensure they are in compliance with the new regulations.

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4
Jan

Are Playgrounds Too Dangerous Or Too Boring?

January 4, 2012

While playgrounds for kids today may be designed with a child’s safety as the first priority, new research shows that these “play safe” designs may be leading to a generation of bored, inactive kids. According to an article released today by WTHR 13 News, research from a study done at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center shows there is a desperate need to balance safety concerns with vigorous and stimulating play.

Data was collected from more than 100 childcare providers and focus groups in different areas and income levels surrounding the city over several years. Three main problems were determined to be contributing to blocking children from getting the exercise they need:

  1. State licensing codes and financial constraints that restrict equipment choices
  2. Injury concerns
  3. Pressure to put classroom learning as a priority above playtime

Researchers added that children are proven to concentrate and learn better after brief periods of vigorous activity.

Opponents to the findings say that researchers failed to take into consideration the number and types of injuries that can occur on the playground. Angela Mickalide, director of research and programs for Safe Kids Worldwide, said that nearly 220,000 children visited Emergency Room facilities in 2009 with playground equipment-related injuries. The most dangerous equipment seemed to be older slides with steep grades and climbers between 8 and 10 feet high.

The Indiana personal injury attorneys with Stewart and Stewart Injury Lawyers would like to know what you think about this debate. Do kids need a heightened challenge during playtime or are playgrounds dangerous enough already? Tell us what you think by posting to our Facebook page.

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28
Dec

Black Ice Presents Serious Danger To Indiana Motorists

December 28, 2011

The dangers of black ice are becoming prevalent as the temperature plummets in the winter months. According to WISHTV 8 News, a 54-year-old woman learned just how dangerous the ice patches can be Tuesday morning in Morgan County after spinning out in her car and ending up upside down in a creek.

The woman told officers that she was driving along Indiana 142 when she hit a patch of ice. The loss of traction sent her vehicle into a spin before catching on dirt and gravel near the edge of the road. The sudden grip on the tires caused the vehicle to roll down an embankment and land on its roof in a creek. The woman was rescued a short time later by firefighters. She was treated for hypothermia and released.

Black ice is prevalent on Indiana roads in the winter. It is clear water that has frozen on dark roadways, presenting a hidden trap for motorists who cannot see the slick pavement. Black ice is particularly prevalent on bridges, below overpasses, and in areas surrounded by trees.

    The Indiana auto accident attorneys with Stewart and Stewart urge motorists to use caution and follow these simple safety tips when driving in winter conditions:

    • Make sure your tires have good traction.
    • Engage four-wheel drive, if you have it.
    • Slow down.
    • Keep your windshield clean.
    • Give yourself more space on the road.
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    21
    Dec

    Indiana Man Wins Lengthy Dispute With Medicaid

    December 21, 2011

    A 38-year-old Pike County, Indiana, man who was paralyzed form the chest down in a car accident earlier this year won a long and tedious battle against Medicaid this week. According to Tristate 25 News, Medicaid will now assist with getting the man moved to a hospital facility where he can better recover from his injuries.

    It all started in August, when the man fell asleep at the wheel and crashed his vehicle. The accident severed the man’s spinal cord, leaving him paralyzed. Since then, he has been receiving treatment at Deaconess Hospital. The man now faces a problem–the facility can no longer offer him any rehabilitation, as they do not specialize in spinal cord injuries.

    The other problem standing in the man’s way was that Medicaid, refused to pay for a transfer to an out of state specialist. After lengthy debate, both sides agreed to a compromise and Medicaid said they would pay for a transfer to a rehabilitation facility in Centerville, Indiana.

    The story points out the growing number of Medicaid claim denials that are being handed down to those truly in need because of funding cuts.

    The Indiana Insurance Dispute Attorneys with Stewart & Stewart Injury Lawyers have decades of experience handling cases just like these for victims when insurance companies don’t want to pay victims what they need and deserve. Contact us today for a free consultation of your case if your insurance provider has denied a legitimate claim you have made for no good reason.

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    14
    Dec

    Massive Drug Shortages Plague Indiana Hospitals

    December 14, 2011

    As officials and lawmakers with the federal government work to create legislature that could help end drug shortages in hospitals across the country, facilities in Indiana are struggling to meet patient and monetary demands the shortages are creating. In an investigative article by WISHTV 8 News, it was said that Hoosier hospitals may be completely out of some drugs, like the pain-killer morphine in 5 mg dosages, and severely limited with other drugs like cancer treatments and vitamin infusions for patients fed intravenously.

    Columbus Regional Hospital Pharmacy Team Leader Matt Hote says he is having a hard time getting a drug called epinephrine. It can be life-saving for a person whose heart has stopped–one dose can be enough to get the heart pumping again. Hote stated though that if the drug is not a contracted order, it can cost him anywhere from 10 to 20 times higher than the retail price.

    So what is being done to fix the problem? The FDA is creating rules that will require drug manufacturers to give a six-month warning before stopping production of a drug. Congress is also working to make price gouging on drugs illegal.

    The Indiana Medical Malpractice Lawyers with Stewart and Stewart know the dangers that these drug shortages can put a patient in. If you have been injured or lost someone you love because a hospital did not have the drugs needed, contact us today for a free initial consultation of your case.

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    7
    Dec

    Poor Emergency Planning at Fairground Stage Collapse

    December 7, 2011

    New information has come to light regarding emergency crew responses to the Indiana State Fairground stage collapse that occurred this summer. According to Channel 13 News, dispatch audiotapes show there was no clear plan to help the wounded get medical attention.

    The first problem the tapes revealed was that three ambulance crews were away from their vehicles when the first calls came in for help. Then, ambulance units carrying critically injured patients couldn’t exit the fairgrounds due to the heavy traffic created by the catastrophe. Some ambulances were even stuck in the mud on the south side of the stage, unable to move.

    Paramedics in emergency situations have patient codes of green, yellow, and red for varying degrees of injury severity (green being minor and red being critical). Command transportation demanded that green and yellow patients wait until all red patients had first been transported. However, these codes weren’t followed and less-critical patients were taken to the hospital before those most in need of medical attention.

    The Indiana Personal Injury Lawyers with Stewart & Stewart understand that the law requires event promoters to provide concert-goers with a safe environment. If you have been hurt because of another person’s negligence, contact us today to discuss your case.

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    30
    Nov

    Indiana Worker Injured In Snowplow-Train Collision

    November 30, 2011

    The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) says that train accidents occur more often at intersections with no cross arms in front of the tracks. That was the case Wednesday morning when a Hendricks County employee was injured in a collision between his snowplow and a train. According to Channel 13 News, the incident occurred at a crossing with County Road 151 West.

    The train’s conductor told sheriff’s deputies that he was heading west at around 45 MPH as he approached the intersection where the accident occurred. He said that the driver of the snowplow slowed his vehicle, but did not completely stop. The conductor attempted to stop the train as the snowplow crawled onto the tracks, but did not have enough time or distance to bring the train to a halt. The two collided and the snowplow rolled–trapping the driver inside.

    He was freed by firefighters and paramedics a short time later and was taken to St. Vincent Hospital to be treated for injuries to his legs and arms.

    Deputies confirmed that the crossing is marked with a stop sign and railroad crossing warnings, but no cross arm mechanism. According to the FRA, 171 people have died this year in highway-rail accidents.

    The Indiana Personal Injury Lawyers with Stewart & Stewart would like to encourage motorists to always stop at railroad intersections regardless of if warning lights are blinking or not. You should also turn down your radio and roll down a window so you can hear if a train is coming.

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    23
    Nov

    Eight Students Taken To The Hospital After South Bend Bus Crash

    November 23, 2011

    A crash involving a school bus and a sedan sent eight children to the hospital Wednesday morning. According to the South Bend Tribune, the accident occurred at 7:57 AM at the intersection of Ireland and Linden Roads in South Bend, Indiana.

    Investigators say that a heavy fog and sun combination may have blinded the bus driver as he pulled through the intersection and out in front of a westbound sedan. The car, driven by a 31-year-old woman, collided with the side of the bus. The impact totaled her car and heavily damaged the bus. Eight children aboard the bus suffered injuries and were transported to Memorial Hospital for treatment.

    An additional six students complained of injuries once they arrived at school and were immediately sent home with a parent to see a doctor. The driver of the car was also suffered back and hip pain at the scene of the crash and was taken to Memorial Hospital as well.

    No charges or fault have been filed in the case yet.

    According to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration T-Bone and angle collisions are the second most deadly type of crash one can be involved in, just behind head-on collisions.

    The Indiana Auto Accident Attorneys with Stewart & Stewart have years of experience handling cases for victims who where hurt in automobile accidents that were no fault of their own. Contact us today for free answers if you have questions regarding your accident.

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    16
    Nov

    New Study Finds Xarelto Could Save Heart Attack Survivors

    November 16, 2011

    A new blood thinning drug, Xarelto, is said to improve a heart attack patient’s chances of suffering from another heart related problem and could prevent death. According to Channel 13 News, the drug could become the gold standard of treatment for millions of Americans who suffer form heart-related conditions each year, despite the drug being known to cause severe bleeding.

    A large scale study of more than 15,000 patients around the world found that users of the drug, which is manufactured by Johnson & Johnson, who had suffered heart attacks or had severe chest pain caused by a heart related problem were less likely to suffer or die from another heart related event if they took the drug in combination with standard anti-clotting medications. The results were reported Sunday at the American Heart Association conference.

    They were met with serious concerns by some who saw the presentation because of the drug’s connection with bleeding that can potentially cause death. Other side effects include numbness and tingling in the limbs, vomiting and/or coughing blood, blood in urine or feces, headaches, swelling, and fluid buildup. Doctors also say the risk of stroke goes up in patients once they stop taking the drug.

    The Indiana Drug Injury Lawyers at Stewart and Stewart suggest contacting an attorney immediately if you experience any problems while taking any medication. Their experienced team can be reached simply by filling out a free online consultation form.

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